Introducing a revolutionary peer-review global surgery journal powered by cryptocurrency

February 10, 2021: Posted by One Surgery Admin The status quo of academic publishing Academic journals date back to the 17th century with the first medical journals published in the late 18th century (1). Over the next 200 years, medical journals have become the most essential form of communication for medical researchers and clinicians all over the world. It is now estimated almost 2 million scientific articles are published each year (2). The rise of the internet has made content more accessible with the development of new and innovative models of publishing, moving away from traditional printed journals, to online access, web...

Surgery, a reflection of poverty in Africa?

January 29, 2021: Posted by Mohamed Kahna For an assessment of a society's progress, it is essential to analyse their advances in health. For this reason, health indicators make it possible, through quantitative data, to assess not only the health status of a population, but also to identify health problems, study future health policies and even compare the health of populations. However, other aspects of health may be reflected in addition to these indicators, so as to identify possible shortcomings or deficiencies. Worldwide, more than 300 million surgical procedures are performed annually, with an early post-operative mortality rate of up to...

One Surgery 2021 Research Roadmap

January 24, 2021: Posted by One Surgery Admin On the back of a very eventful 2020 - culminating in our successful crowdfunding campaign to develop a cryptocurrency powered medical journal, One.Surgery is releasing our 2021 roadmap for its research projects. We aim to develop a strong community foundation and continue to innovate in the research space with clear, focused goals. 1. Developing a research team One.Surgery now has a dedicated international research team, fully funded for one year by the Bitcoin Cash crowdfunding campaign (salary paid in BCH). We are now working together to develop the following projects for this year. 2. Maintaining...

The role of ENT Surgery in Global Health

January 11, 2021: Posted by Shirwa Sheik-Ali Authors: Mr Shirwa Sheik Ali, Mr Sharaf Sheik Ali  It has been reported that the poorest third of the world’s population obtain only 3.5% of surgical operations conducted globally and that 5 billion people do not have access to safe, affordable surgical care when required (1,2). Shortfalls in infrastructure, trained personnel and political priority partly account for this (3,4). Non-communicable diseases, including those of ear, nose and throat (ENT) conditions, have a low profile in the field of global health. Despite this, hearing impairment that is disabling is the most common disability internationally (5). Indeed,...

How COVID-19 Pandemic is Fueling Antimicrobial Resistance

July 22, 2020: Posted by Ankit Raj The current COVID-19 pandemic has exposed lots of fault lines in our healthcare ecosystem and magnified certain looming threats. One of them is antimicrobial resistance. Antimicrobial resistance despite of its pandemic-like nature never quite got the media coverage that it deserved. Mostly because the repercussions and threats of antimicrobial resistance veiled behind layers of scientific and medical knowledge outside the scope of understanding and imagination for most people on the planet, much like climate change. However, as a result of our continued ignorance, a world without effective antibiotics, where simpler diseases killing individuals...

Equity in Academic Global Surgery

July 18, 2020: Posted by Ankit Raj Globally 5 billion people lack access to safe, timely, and affordable surgical care. A significant proportion of these 5 billion belongs to lower and middle-income countries and limited-resource settings. But do we know how many surgeons, nurses, trainees, medical students, and supportive healthcare staff lack access to affordable and high-quality academic research opportunities, publications, projects, and skill development? Equity, or lack thereof, is rarely talked about in the field of academic surgery, very specifically academic global surgery. Because any advocacy concerning that is suspiciously considered as a rant than anything else. Also, most trainees,...